A Night of Thinking Through Senses

Palais de la Dynastie / Dynastiepaleis
  • 13/05 | 22:00 - 2:00

€ 5
EN

If language is the coded vehicle of our communication, what exists before it? This night explores the sphere that might exist before the codes: minimal gestures, the materiality of sounds, close proximities, a lecture-performance and a slow reading in the dark invite the audience to explore thinking through several senses, a form of thinking before the words are there. In reference to the ideas and experiences of neo-concrete art, and the work of Lygia Clark in particular, this night opens a “rite without myths”, a space for a conversation in a language yet to be formed. A space in which to encounter the other in ways that are not given, losing the privilege of thinking about ourselves as individuals and moving into experiencing the space between us that is still to be constructed. Being before the codes might eventually open up the possibility of exploring new ones.

See also
Beyond the Codes: A Night of Travelling Beyond Thinking

With
Fabián Barba, Kate McIntosh, Mette Edvardsen, Enrico Malatesta, Bryana Fritz, Henry Andersen

Contributions by
André Lepecki

Curated by
Daniel Blanga-Gubbay & Lars Kwakkenbos

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A Night of Thinking Through Senses

“Until our era, the artist was only a thermometer in which the new spiritual reality of the future was indicated. There will come a time when everyone will be that thermometer and bring within her/himself that future-present.”
Lygia Clark, undated manuscript

If language is the coded vehicle of our communication, what existed before it? This night explores a sphere of existence prior to codes: by way of minimal gestures, the materiality of sounds, close proximities, a lecture-performance, and a slow reading in the dark, the audience is invited to explore thinking through several senses, a form of thought before words. In reference to the ideas and experiences of neo-concrete art and the work of Lygia Clark, in particular, this night opens a ‘rite without myths’, a space for conversation in a language yet to be formed. A space in which to encounter the other in ways that are not a given, losing the privilege of thinking about ourselves as individuals and moving into experiencing the space between us that has yet to be constructed. Being before the codes might eventually open up the possibility of exploring new ones.

Not only has Clark’s claim of creating ‘rites without myth’ inspired this night, but her oeuvre has as well. From 1964 onwards, after having become a main figure within the neo-concrete movement, Lygia Clark’s work shifted gradually, but no less radically, beyond the sphere of the visible into that of art without art, where the act of doing became the most important aspect. Later on, her work resembled a form of therapy, but it also moved towards new, relational forms of subjectivity and intimacy.

In an essay on Clark’s work written in 1999, Brazilian psychoanalyst and cultural critic Suely Rolnik refers to an act of deterritorialisation: “The figure of the spectator begins to deterritorialise itself at the same time as the art object is no longer reducible to visibility, not even having the possibility to exist in inert passivity, isolated from the one who executes it.” In the mid-1960s, Clark’s work began to deterritorialise the spectator, moving him from active participation towards a sensation that her work evoked in the one who touched it. The same might happen at various moments during this night. Before the Codes could embody a journey through Lygia Clark’s visionary work, with some contributions letting the participants’ bodies – to paraphrase Rolnik – register a new reality of sensations, and other contributions reflecting and speculating on such realities. Meanwhile, we are surrounded by the works of Tarek Atoui, suggesting and embodying a space of sound where these sensations can also come home.

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