Walker

Different locations in the city

WALKER
21/03 > 24/05
Opening on 21/03 – 18:00
Tuesday to Sunday – 12:00 > 18:00

FILM RETROSPECTIVE
GALERIES Cinéma
21/03 > 24/05

GOODBYE, DRAGON INN (2003)
Special screening at Cinéma Marivaux
5/05 – 20:30
1h 20min

Born in Malaysia in 1957, Tsai Ming-liang is one of the most prominent film directors of the new cinema movement in Taiwan. In 1994 his film Vive L’ amour was honoured with the Golden Lion award at the Venice Film Festival, and established a place for him in the world of international film. In 2009, the first dramatisation of the Louvre’s collection “Le Louvre s’offre aux cineastes”, entitled Face, has become the benchmark for films venturing into the world of art galleries. In recent years, Tsai Ming-liang has also moved into installation art. His works have been displayed in Venice, Shanghai and Nagoya and have been well received. Among the pieces, It is a Dream has been reserved as a permanent exhibit at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum since 2010. At the invitation of the National Chiang Kai-Shek Cultural Centre in 2011, Tsai has returned to theatre performance with three monodramas, entitled Only You, after a 27-year absence. Since 2012, he has been working on a long project of filming Lee Kang-sheng’s slow walk, cooperating with various cities and organisations. To date, he has completed six short works. The latest feature, Stray Dogs , won the Grand Jury Prize at the 70th Venice Film Festival.

Films by
Tsai Ming-liang

With
Lee Kang-sheng

Presentation
Kunstenfestivaldesarts, GALERIES Cinéma

Co-production
Kunstenfestivaldesarts, GALERIES Cinéma

Supported by
Cultural Ministry of Taiwan

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Tsai Ming-liang was born in Malaysia in 1957, six years before the independence of the country, in the small village of Kuching, where he spent the first 20 years of his life. He developed a particular interest in cinema that he took with him to Taipei, where he went to study at the age of twenty, and where he discovered a wide range of classics from the history of European and American cinema.

After his studies, he directed several movies with teenagers and nonprofessional actors from which he especially retained Lee Kang-sheng. His first feature film Rebels of the Neon God (1992) is a view of the aesthetic and topographical foundation of his work. But it is his second feature film Vive L’Amour (1994), which was recorded in Venice, that became known in Europe and put Taiwanese cinema on the world map.

His films are most known as fiction, but they are also a reflection on the everyday life in Taiwan. A country the size of a nation but with the vulnerability of an island. The films of Tsai Ming-liang are crossed by the realities of Taiwanese life.

Like most filmmakers of his generation and region, his long scenes and story lines don’t obey the rules of contemporary cinema. Tsai Ming-liang makes parallel works of art in museums that complement his films. Tsai Ming-liang will use the space of the cinema to generate a sense of melancholy, this in contrast with contemporary reality. He invites the viewers to think about the evolution within the world of cinema.

The video installation Walker is a compilation of six films inspired by the life of the Buddhist monk Xuan Zang. This monk and traveler is a very well-known figure in traditional China. Xuan Zang (b. 602) went to the monastery at the age of 13 and became a monk when he was twenty. Then he went to China in search of ancient writings from Buddhism. Dissatisfied with the misinterpretations and the incomplete nature of the existing Buddhist scriptures, he continued his journey to India, a journey that took 19 years.

With this series Walker, I want the viewer to think about the following question: Seeing a man who walks this slowly, without really having a goal, not moving or talking, is that a cinematographic work? These movies make the viewer think about how he deals with time and space in his daily life. They allow you to stand still and absorb the environment you live in and determine the rhythm of it yourself.”

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Born in Malaysia in 1957, Tsai Ming-liang is one of the most prominent film directors of the new cinema movement in Taiwan. In 1994 his film Vive L’ amour was honoured with the Golden Lion award at the Venice Film Festival, and established a place for him in the world of international film. In 2009, the first dramatisation of the Louvre’s collection “Le Louvre s’offre aux cineastes”, entitled Face, has become the benchmark for films venturing into the world of art galleries. In recent years, Tsai Ming-liang has also moved into installation art. His works have been displayed in Venice, Shanghai and Nagoya and have been well received. Among the pieces, It is a Dream has been reserved as a permanent exhibit at the Taipei Fine Arts Museum since 2010. At the invitation of the National Chiang Kai-Shek Cultural Centre in 2011, Tsai has returned to theatre performance with three monodramas, entitled Only You, after a 27-year absence. Since 2012, he has been working on a long project of filming Lee Kang-sheng’s slow walk, cooperating with various cities and organisations. To date, he has completed six short works. The latest feature, Stray Dogs, won the Grand Jury Prize at the 70th Venice Film Festival.

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