Terres de Confusion

Filmmuseum / Musée du Cinéma

11/05 > 20:30
12/05 > 20:00
13/05 > 10:30 & 14:00
13/05 > 15:30 > Debate

FR - 60’

In Almeria, Khadiri looks up at the sky, and as he speaks raises his hand to the height at which he is looking: “The sun’s immense, isn’t it? In the past people used to pray to it, but my hand can conceal it. Today, the power of intelligence is immense and serves to conceal lots of things. If you set one truth against another truth, you can stifle it, overshadow it, make reality disappear.”

A movie with on and off screen : Soufian, Issan, Elena, Ernesto, Ale, Adam, Khadiri, Bob, Noémi, Pilou, Janeth, Juanco, Titou, Ibrahim … and all those who can’t have their name printed.

Director : Paola Stevenne

Editing : Anne De Jaer

Directors of photography : Rémon Fromont alias le soleil, Ichame le Libanais alias Alaouié

Sound : Fredo Merto alias Fredouille

Assistant to the director : Simon le fou alias Backès

Location manager & accomplice : Serge Thiry

Translator & accomplice : Fab’ alias Fabrice George

Production assistant : Maude Roupsard

Administrator : Maggy Souris

/Producer : Isabelle Truc

Production : Iota production (Brussel/Bruxelles)

Coproduction : RTBF, ARTE, Communauté française de Belgique, Wallonie Image Production (W.I.P.), Luna Blue Films, KunstenFESTIVALdesArts

Presentation : Filmmuseum/Musée du Cinéma, KunstenFESTIVALdesArts

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In Almeria, Khadiri looks up at the sky, and raises his hand to the height at which he is looking: “The sun’s immense, isn’t it? In the past people used to pray to it, but my hand can conceal it. If you set one truth against another truth, you can stifle it, overshadow it, make reality disappear.”

Paola Stevenne:

“I was five when I saw Zaventem airport for the first time. I had come from Santiago in Chile. My mother was fleeing the military dictatorship. Later I went back to Latin America, but after a year I decided that my life was in Belgium. Coming back I made friends on the plane. But touching down at Madrid, there were problems with Immigration. That’s when I understood that I had quite a bit of luck in the 1970s: detention centres didn’t exist then. I returned in July. Four days later there was an escape from the detention centre at Steenokkerzeel. I wanted to go and see what was happening. I met people, received letters. A few months later, they murdered Semira Adamu, the young Nigerian woman they were trying to deport. A few weeks after this event happened, nothing more was heard in the media. I didn’t want to let it be forgotten. I wanted to tell a Belgian story, the story of Schengen.”

“Schengen was at the time the Berlin Wall came down. Schengen rebuilt a 10 metre high wall in Ceuta, on the border between Spain and Morocco. I wanted to cross the Schengen zone starting in the south and going further and further north. Maybe because I understand the codes of the south better, the desires, the people. I wanted to see what changed. I had a feeling that became deeper than it was at the beginning: that law is an illusion and that reality is something else. In four and a half months I travelled from Ceuta to Madrid to Andalucia, from Paris to Brussels, from Berlin to the borders with Poland. I searched for what it means to be “a foreigner” in Europe today. I listened to the “foreigners’” stories, memories, hopes, fears and plans. A subjective point of view based on sensations, feelings and encounters.”

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