Quizoola! & Scar Stories

Different locations in the city

Quizoola!
b-space.be
6 Mei/Mai/May 18:00 - 00:00
Het publiek kan doorlopend in en uit/Le public est libre d'entrer et de sortir à tout moment/The audience is free to arrive and leave at any point
Taal/Langue/Language: Engels/anglais/English

Scar Stories
Les Brigittines
16, 17, 18 Mei/Mai/May 20:30
19 Mei/Mai/May 23:00
20, 21 Mei/Mai/May 18:00
Duur/Durée/Duration: 1:20
Taal/Langue/Language: Engels/anglais/English
Simultaanvertaling/Traduction simultanée/Simultaneous translation: Nl & Fr

Scar Stories (Installation)
b-space.be
6 Mei/Mai/May 14:00 - 00:00
7-27 Mei/Mai/May van woensdag tot zondag/du mercredi au dimanche/from Wednesday to Sunday 11:00 - 19:00
Vrije toegang/Entrée libre/Free entrance

"Do you have one scar ? How did you get it ? Who knows about it ? Do you like it ?". Forced Entertainment is, according to The Guardian, "Britain's most brilliant experimental theatre company". Recently, the members went around Brussels with their microphone on and the camera running to ask people about their scars because "they reveal the layout of landscapes living in us". Their recordings form the basis of an installation, Scar Stories, and have been a key starting point for a new performance of the same name. Forced is also at the Festival with a single performance of Quizoola! The event is a kind of twisted Trivial Pursuit with three actors: light, profound, immodest, pestering and poetic. One thousand five hundred questions have been written for it, but not a single answer.

Quizoola! (Theatre)

Tekst vragen/Texte questions/Texte questions: Tim Etchells
Performers: Tim Etchells, Richard Lowdon, Terry O'Connor.
Scenografie/Scénographie/Design: Richard Lowdon
Licht/Eclairage/Lighting: Nigel Edwards
Productieleiding/Direction de production/Production management: Andy Clarke
Administratie/Administration: Verity Leigh
Marketing: Helen Burgun
Educatieve dienst/Service éducatif/Education: Helen Russell
Productie/Production: Forced Entertainment (Sheffield)
Presentatie/Présentation/Presentation: KunstenFESTIVALdesArts


Scar Stories (Theatre)

Concept: Tim Etchells, Forced Entertainment
Regie/Mise en scène/Direction: Tim Etchells
Performers: Richard Lowdon, Terry O'Connor
Scenografie/Scénographie/Design: Richard Lowdon
Licht/Eclairage/Lighting: Nigel Edwards
Productieleiding/Direction de production/Production management: Andy Clarke
Research/Recherches/Research: Ingrid van Eycken
Administratie/Administration: Verity Leigh
Marketing: Helen Burgun
Educatieve dienst/Service éducatif/Education: Helen Russell
Productie/Production: Forced Entertainment (Sheffield), Bruxelles/Brussel 2000, The British Council, KunstenFESTIVALdesArts.
Presentatie i.s.m./Présentation en collaboration avec/Presentation in collaboration with: Brigittinenkapel en de Stad Brussel/Chapelle des Brigittines et la Ville de Bruxelles


Scar Stories (Installation)

Concept: Tim Etchells, Hugo Glendinning, Forced Entertainment
Research/Recherche/Research: Ingrid van Eycken
Productie/Production: Forced Entertainment (Sheffield), Bruxelles/Brussel 2000, The British Council, KunstenFESTIVALdesArts

Forced Entertainment: Robin Arthur, Tim Etchells, Richard Lowdon, Claire Marshall, Cathy Naden, Terry O'Connor.

Forced Entertainment wordt gesubsidieerd door/est subventionné par/is regularly funded by: The Arts Council of England, Yorkshire Arts and Sheffield City Council.

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Do you have a scar? How did you get it? Who knows about it? Do you like it?

Forced Entertainment is, according to The Guardian, "Britain's most brilliant experimental theatre company". Recently, the members went around Brussels with their microphone on and the camera running to ask people about their scars because "they reveal the layout of landscapes living in us". Their recordings form the basis of an installation, Scar Stories and have been a key starting point for a new performance of the same name. Forced is also at the Festival with a single performance of Quizoola!. The event is a kind of twisted Trivial Pursuit with three actors: light, profound, immodest, pestering and poetic. One thousand five hundred questions have been written for it, but not a single answer.

"The need to confess" runs through all of Forced Entertainment's work. The actors are melancholic "entertainers" who force themselves to turn the concerns of the century lurking in everyone into something beautiful, important and laughable. "We try to do spiritual work aimed at atheists", they say. "The work requires commitment and investment taking a risk, exposing our own mistakes and weaknesses." These actors go on stage without a safety net - they get under the skin and refresh our thinking in a curiously uplifting way. Urgency is their driving force - "You have to walk quickly because the continents are drifting apart" - the way in which they do it is inimitable, their subjects profoundly human. Their confessions are intense, with no notion of good or evil. "There's never a wrong answer; we harvest everything offered to us. Our work asks questions and feeds dreams. The spectators aren't onlookers, they're witnesses." Going to one of Forced's productions is like finding refuge, somewhere at night, feeling you belong to these last tightrope walkers of the boards, ready for anything to subdue the blind fears that lead to catastrophe, to begin by taming their shadows to bring them out into the light, dancing.

B: We are distressed and sorrowful angels!
A: If you don't get up, who will shout and sing a song at the stupid moon?
B: We are drunk and dependable angels and we can raise our friends from out of the dead.
(From 200% & Bloody Thirsty, Forced Entertainment, Sheffield 1988)

In 1984, when the company was formed in the steel-making town of Sheffield (South Yorkshire), Forced Entertainment had just one wish: "to discuss the concerns of the times in a language born out of them." Thatcher was still in power: "each of our votes showing our disapproval gave us the same government for ten years!" Under the Conservative government it was hard to get things going; receiving funding, which was based on recognition, was a real battle. They may be from the heart of England, but they belong to this murmuring of new voices that is emerging from as far apart as Wuppertal (Pina Bausch) to New York (Wooster Group). They open up a divide, assert a way of being on stage and in the world, writing without pretension yet with incredible poetry. They harness and disrobe on stage the subconscious of cities and lives. Their city, Sheffield, where The Full Monty was filmed, is in decline like many others. Forced Entertainment likes to redraw new maps on which the dominant landmarks are jumbled up. Focusing now on scars, the group is looking at what lies behind them - "the marks that living leaves on our skin, the physical memory of a great emotion, the map of our dangerous lives, of a biography, of a town, of a landscape".

In Brussels they conducted numerous interviews and collected anonymous stories: a 7cm-scar on the hip of a young man measured by the army "so that his body could be identified if he were killed in action"; scars of brawls, operations, accidents at work; scars that we hide or show off, shameful or useful; wounds that were voluntary or involuntary, harmless or almost fatal. As they tell their stories, the characters assert themselves, taking a look at others, at themselves, strong feelings linked to the precise memory of the scar. During the Festival, Forced Entertainment will be showing the material they filmed in the heart of the city in a video installation. Tim Etchells, the group's writer, and actors Richard Lowdon and Terry O'Connor used these echoes of intense, real-life experiences to devise an homonymous play, Scar Stories, one hour and twenty minutes of recomposed fragments during which the scars magnetise themselves into one body. The actors will examine these pessimistic and optimistic reflections of life when they perform their autopsy on the body. Sitting on a metallic structure in the small nave of an old chapel-turned-venue for dance and theatre, the public will be a part of this body's history. The space, a theatre of anatomy. Its intimate and comical ritual, the disclosure of the tales extracted from beneath the scars.

A little further away in a cellar in town, the actors will be putting on one performance of Quizoola! (1996). Taking it in turns, there will be three actors, two in the ring and one at the entrance with sad faces painted like clowns. On an empty stage with a few spotlights, the audience close by, one of them leafs through their collection of 1,500 questions and asks: "What is your earliest memory? Do you like to drive a car fast down a motorway at night? What is fire? What is love? Is John Wayne brave?" Leaving room for chance and the actor's mood, the questions are a mix - the sort a policeman would ask or botanical, philosophical and personal questions, the answers improvised, hesitant or fluent. The actor discovers himself in them, the human being too, with his dreams or what he can remember from TV news, his sense of decency or his lies. Intimate and enclosed, the space is open for people to come and go as they please. The strange quiz itself will last six hours, because art appropriates the time, condensing it or extending it to infinity.

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