Carnet de notes à deux voix

Filmmuseum / Musée du Cinéma

11/05 > 18:30 & 20:30
12/05 > 20:30
13/05 > 14:00
13/05 > 15:30 > Debate

FR - Subtitles: NL - 60’

This film is a riot. Not the kind that people are scared of, that people suppress and then forget. Not the kind you see on the television. This film is an invisible and quiet riot between a girl born in the land of bison and a minister. “I wonder,” said the latter one morning in September 1999, “if there is a link between ethnic origin and crime”. The girl climbed the wall… Far away, a thousand fierce bison were crossing the territories of her memory.

Production : Olivier Rausin (Artémis production)

Supported by : Brussel/Bruxelles 2000, GSARA, Frédéric & Rajae, KunstenFESTIVALdesArts

Presentation : Filmmuseum/Musée du Cinéma, KunstenFESTIVALdesArts

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Rajae:

“We wanted to make a film about North African immigration in Belgium, following the example of Mémoires d’immigrés made by Yamina Benguigui on Algerians in France. Forty years ago, a letter from the Belgian government invited Moroccans to come and work in Belgium. Who knows this story? No one: not on the Belgian side nor the Moroccan side. But how could we get people to talk? There are quite a few people who have a problem with the image that the media has given them. They are allergic to everything involving cameras, films and anything that is ‘talking about themselves’. My father doesn’t want to talk: ‘We’ve been here 35 years’, he said, ‘and they’ve never been interested in us’. There was a bit of embarrassment and at the same time I think my father was surprised that his daughter is interested in his immigration.”

Frédéric:

This film is a riot. Not the kind where grimacing faces clash with the forces of law and order, throwing stones. Not the kind that people are scared of, that are suppressed and then forgotten. Not the kind you see on television. This film is an invisible and quiet riot in the land of bison. Between a girl born in the land of bison and a minister. One September morning in 1999, this minister puts his mouth right up close to her ear. “I wonder”, he murmured, “if there is a link between ethnic origin and crime”.

Rajae:

That created an explosion in my head, especially the way in which the issue was tackled. The study has come out and what is it? A hit parade?

Frédéric:

The girl climbs the wall. Far away, a thousand fierce bison were crossing the territories of her memory. At the bottom of the wall, a boy without feet is watching her. Together they decide to set off in search of a Belgian story, that of North African immigration. A search for a 40-year-old story in several stages. First stage: a book of images in two voices. A book of images to follow…”

Rajae:

We had the feeling that if we started at the beginning of the story, i.e. 40 years ago, we would never get round to touching upon other issues that concerned us. What is migration? What does it mean to be Moroccan? What does it mean to be Belgian…? In any case this inquiry shook things up. Before being a study, it was already an answer. It was absurd. Now I’ve got more hindsight and filming has got the upper hand.

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